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Benefits of Dry Needling

Updated: Feb 24, 2023




Osteopaths believe in approaching musculoskeletal issues with a holistic process treating the body as a unit. Often resulting in treating more than just the specific region where you may be experiencing pain, stiffness or any type of dysfunction. Dry needling may be a fantastic tool in order to get you moving and feeling pain free.


To get the best possible results for our patients, Osteopaths often utilise a combination of both hands-on techniques and movement-based rehabilitation to help get our patients back to functioning optimally and being able to complete all the activities and sports that they love. One of the treatment techniques that many Osteopaths use is dry needling.


Dry needling involves using a very thin needle to pierce the skin to the muscle belly. Often the needles are inserted into trigger points, which are palpable tender points within a specific muscle, which can cause what is referred to as a twitch response from the muscle.




Dry needling has been linked with triggering certain responses within the body that can result in a reduction of pain, improving range of motion and overall function. As such, it can be very beneficial for treating a wide variety of complaints and has been shown to improve dysfunction when used in the head, trunk, upper limb and lower limb regions.


If you think that dry needling might be something that you’d like to try, next time you are in at Appy Movement mention it to your Osteopath, and they can let you know if you may benefit from it and give it a go.



References

Boyles, R., Fowler, R., Ramsey, D., & Burrows, E. (2015). Effectiveness of trigger point dry needling for multiple body regions: a systematic review. Journal of Manual & Manipulative Therapy, 23(5), 276-293. https://doi.org/10.1179/2042618615Y.0000000014


Gattie, E., Cleland, J. A., & Snodgrass, S. (2017). The Effectiveness of Trigger Point Dry Needling for Musculoskeletal Conditions by Physical Therapists: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, 47(3), 133-149. https://doi.org/10.2519/jospt.2017.7096



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